Nastogastric tube and IVI fluids skills session

We had an amazing skills session a couple of weeks ago about how to insert a nasogastric tube (NG) into a patient (using a mannequin) and how to put up some IVI fluids.

Before I started my skills session, I had observed a couple of NG tubes being inserted. During coroner court, I had heard some awful stories of how an NG insertion can go wrong. So, I was a little nervous about having this skills session and I am a little nervous about ever attempting to put one in but I will always try my best when the time arrives. Discussing with your mentor and be open, honest and stating how competent you feel doing something is a huge help I think.

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The skills session was fantastic as always. Good to get practicing my skills and has given me confidence in doing this on a real patient at some point. Just practicing these skills can make all the difference. My advice to students out there;

  • practice, practice and practice before you are set lose into the real world and real patients. Make use of your university facilities to do this. We have the marvellous SPACE for us to practice all day long if we wish.
  • Be confident in what you’re doing and your patient will have confidence in you.
  • Be competent in everything you’re doing out there, ensure you are comfortable and trained well to do the skill you are about to do. Patient safety first.
  • Be open and honest if you are NOT confident or competent.
  • Talk to your mentor and tell her all of this. They can guide you and give you more training.

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And then there was setting up IV fluids. A few points to remember for this:

  • Check your prescription is correct and signed for by the doctor.
  • Right dose, right time, right patient, right route, right drug. 
  • Check the fluid bag for any signs of damage. The bag should be filled up, clear and not leaking.
  • Check your fluids are in date.
  • Use antiseptic non touch technique as you do not want any bacteria getting into the line or the patient!
  • Once your bag is up and attached – check for air bubbles and if any GET RID! You do not want to put and air bubble into a patient and cause death potentially.
  • If in doubt get you mentor to double check everything.

At the end of the day, you are caring for real lives. You must always protect  your patient and if you do not feel you are confident in something ask for help or say you are not confident in doing that. Goodbye for now….

‘There is no harm in being human.’

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34 years old and finally achieving my dream of becoming a nurse.

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